kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Bouncing cats)
Just Wanted to Say

Hey! I got back on! (Haven't been able to for the past few hours.)

And I felt as if I should congratulate the LJ team on stubbornly resisting the various miserable and unending attacks against it, whether they be DDOS, phishing attempts on members, or what-have-you. Miserable saboteurs are miserable, and flawed but fun LJ is flawed, but fun — and in the right, at least in resisting attempts to shut it down.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Bouncing cats)
Just Wanted to Say

Hey! I got back on! (Haven't been able to for the past few hours.)

And I felt as if I should congratulate the LJ team on stubbornly resisting the various miserable and unending attacks against it, whether they be DDOS, phishing attempts on members, or what-have-you. Miserable saboteurs are miserable, and flawed but fun LJ is flawed, but fun — and in the right, at least in resisting attempts to shut it down.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (catwins)
The Past Is Another Country
And the remarkable [livejournal.com profile] amberite  has meditated on that, and on how that country is always changing - and what that could mean in terms of Steampunk. Go, you, and read it, because I think it's impressively close to spot on.

(I find it interesting that I'm typing these words as I watch an Argentine documentary on the discovery of an almost complete copy, long thought nonexistent, of Fritz Lang's Metropolis.)
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (catwins)
The Past Is Another Country
And the remarkable [livejournal.com profile] amberite  has meditated on that, and on how that country is always changing - and what that could mean in terms of Steampunk. Go, you, and read it, because I think it's impressively close to spot on.

(I find it interesting that I'm typing these words as I watch an Argentine documentary on the discovery of an almost complete copy, long thought nonexistent, of Fritz Lang's Metropolis.)
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Buster thinks)
Returning to Earth

Today was an interesting day. It wasn't spent in the limbo of a hospital, nor in the jubilation of Bob's return home, or completely sacked out in post-hospital collapse (that happened Tuesday; I came home from dealing with the car and Bob promptly ordered me to bed, and left a message with my boss saying he didn't trust me to drive. I slept right through until 8 p.m.)

Today, I actually got some work done, including an interview done on the road - note to self: don't ever - ever - write notes while driving again. Even when you don't take your eyes from the road, making your notes look like spirit-writing as a result.  And my beloved got the washer put back together.

Let me repeat that. He got the washer put back together. And I washed the first in-house load of laundry of the past three weeks. How awesome is that?

And before I head off to bed (where going to sleep with my head on his chest  again is still wonderfully new and wonderfully old) enjoy interesting links, courtesy of the Pew Research Center. This one includes
interesting figures on Americans and their use of technology (which my dyspeptic beloved pointed out lags far behind many other nations around the globe), while this one is an absolutely fascinating look at how mobile tech skews demographics skews polls.
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Buster thinks)
Returning to Earth

Today was an interesting day. It wasn't spent in the limbo of a hospital, nor in the jubilation of Bob's return home, or completely sacked out in post-hospital collapse (that happened Tuesday; I came home from dealing with the car and Bob promptly ordered me to bed, and left a message with my boss saying he didn't trust me to drive. I slept right through until 8 p.m.)

Today, I actually got some work done, including an interview done on the road - note to self: don't ever - ever - write notes while driving again. Even when you don't take your eyes from the road, making your notes look like spirit-writing as a result.  And my beloved got the washer put back together.

Let me repeat that. He got the washer put back together. And I washed the first in-house load of laundry of the past three weeks. How awesome is that?

And before I head off to bed (where going to sleep with my head on his chest  again is still wonderfully new and wonderfully old) enjoy interesting links, courtesy of the Pew Research Center. This one includes
interesting figures on Americans and their use of technology (which my dyspeptic beloved pointed out lags far behind many other nations around the globe), while this one is an absolutely fascinating look at how mobile tech skews demographics skews polls.

Dept. of *snrt*

Wednesday, 12 May 2010 01:05 am
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Buster thinks)
It's Been Niggling At Me
Ever since the British election, I've been absolutely racking my brain every time I looked at David Cameron. Who the hell did he remind me of, I asked myself, who?

Now I know.







 
Don't they look as if they came from the same family?








White House Secretary Robert Gibbs   ....................aaaaaand........................The Shiny New Prime Minister

*I wonder what they'd think?
**Why yes, I do amuse myself, why do you ask?
 

Dept. of *snrt*

Wednesday, 12 May 2010 01:05 am
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Buster thinks)
It's Been Niggling At Me
Ever since the British election, I've been absolutely racking my brain every time I looked at David Cameron. Who the hell did he remind me of, I asked myself, who?

Now I know.







 
Don't they look as if they came from the same family?








White House Secretary Robert Gibbs   ....................aaaaaand........................The Shiny New Prime Minister

*I wonder what they'd think?
**Why yes, I do amuse myself, why do you ask?
 

Pawl-tics

Friday, 7 May 2010 01:27 am
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Liz 10 Rules)
Parliamentary Frenzy on the North Side
Yes, I just finished watching (checks watch) four solid hours of BBC coverage of the British national election. I have, finally and incontrovertibly, exposed myself as both an election wonk and an Anglophile. I know. Restrain your expostulations of surprise.

Things that occurred to me whilst watching:
  •  I think all the electoral candidates in every Canadian and American election race should have to stand next to each other, wearing badges and ribbons of indecent size and florid design, while someone stands at a microphone with the results, and gives their full name (family name first, given last), and the amount of votes, and declares one of them the winner, while the others look stoic, blank, 'luuded or, in the case of the Monster Raving Loony, etc. Party, gleefully goofy. I think it would do a great deal to advance a sense of humility on the part of North American politicians.
  • British pundits and journalists (at least the live media types) are far more sophisticated, witty and - to the people they're interviewing - heel-rockingly rude than I am used to seeing in election coverage. They also get to interview slightly tipsy aging Tory supporters like gazillionaire once-upon-a-time rocker Bill Wyman. (Tory. Christ.) It was all quite impressive and bracing. And I'm saying that seriously.
  • Those pundits and journalists are also pretty damned sturdy. The same guys (most of whom looked ever-so-slightly professorially frail) just soldiered on, hour after hour - remember, this was at 3 a.m., 4 a.m., 4:30 a.m. and straight on 'til morning their time - with only the occasional stumble or flash of inevitably wittily-expressed irritation, and a just-noticeable growth in some five (a.m.) o'clock shadow. I mean, our television gangs over here have nothing on them.
  • I have to admit I'd never thought of it as a "hung parliament." In Canada, where I grew up, minority governments were, if not commonplace, definitely not rare. And that's what we called them. A hung parliament sounds ... racy.
  • And the turnouts; 68 percent; 77 percent; higher in other places - that's nothing to be laughed at. I kept looking at those percentages and saying to myself, when the hell are we going to start getting anywhere near those numbers? Damn.

Pawl-tics

Friday, 7 May 2010 01:27 am
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Liz 10 Rules)
Parliamentary Frenzy on the North Side
Yes, I just finished watching (checks watch) four solid hours of BBC coverage of the British national election. I have, finally and incontrovertibly, exposed myself as both an election wonk and an Anglophile. I know. Restrain your expostulations of surprise.

Things that occurred to me whilst watching:
  •  I think all the electoral candidates in every Canadian and American election race should have to stand next to each other, wearing badges and ribbons of indecent size and florid design, while someone stands at a microphone with the results, and gives their full name (family name first, given last), and the amount of votes, and declares one of them the winner, while the others look stoic, blank, 'luuded or, in the case of the Monster Raving Loony, etc. Party, gleefully goofy. I think it would do a great deal to advance a sense of humility on the part of North American politicians.
  • British pundits and journalists (at least the live media types) are far more sophisticated, witty and - to the people they're interviewing - heel-rockingly rude than I am used to seeing in election coverage. They also get to interview slightly tipsy aging Tory supporters like gazillionaire once-upon-a-time rocker Bill Wyman. (Tory. Christ.) It was all quite impressive and bracing. And I'm saying that seriously.
  • Those pundits and journalists are also pretty damned sturdy. The same guys (most of whom looked ever-so-slightly professorially frail) just soldiered on, hour after hour - remember, this was at 3 a.m., 4 a.m., 4:30 a.m. and straight on 'til morning their time - with only the occasional stumble or flash of inevitably wittily-expressed irritation, and a just-noticeable growth in some five (a.m.) o'clock shadow. I mean, our television gangs over here have nothing on them.
  • I have to admit I'd never thought of it as a "hung parliament." In Canada, where I grew up, minority governments were, if not commonplace, definitely not rare. And that's what we called them. A hung parliament sounds ... racy.
  • And the turnouts; 68 percent; 77 percent; higher in other places - that's nothing to be laughed at. I kept looking at those percentages and saying to myself, when the hell are we going to start getting anywhere near those numbers? Damn.

Oy

Thursday, 18 March 2010 12:06 am
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (nel as oneliel)
Inertial Dampener
     Here's how it worked.
     I developed a headache sometime between 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. I then ate the wrong thing, or not enough of the right thing, and the headache kept going. I decided against going for the big anti-pain guns because ... well, because. I have a bet going with myself.
     So. Where was I? Right. Headache.
     Watched television because that was easier than thinking with the the pain. Realized, of course, that one shouldn't watch television when one is in pain, but the inertia that flowed from a warm cat sitting on my lap, and flicking between "Twister" on one channel (I love that movie) and Rachel Maddow (who I believe should be one of my best friends, but to tell her so would be gauche, I think you'll agree) further slowed my thought processes, so that the option of turning off the screen didn't occur to me.
     The pain leveled up (and would our grandparents even understand such a phrase in their youth? No. Of course not, but then I won't understand the language of my grandchildren if it comes streaming out of the fog of the future into my ears at this moment) but I'd be damned if I was going to haul out the big guns.
    So I thought about writing a quick post before admitting defeat and going to bed. What to write, what to write?
    I let my fingers think for me, and the phrase "inertial dampener" flowed from them as a title. (Actually, my fingers first typed intertial, and I had to decide whether I really wanted to type "interstitial" or "inertial." The final decision was as you see above.
     And then I realized that a) I didn't think that had much to do with my own sense of inertia and b) I didn't rightly remember (or perhaps know in the first place) what an inertial dampener was. So I decided to go to Infoplease and type the phrase into their encyclopedia search.
     Among the items returned to me, courtesy the search results:
  • Mach's principle;
  • mass, in physics;
  • heaves (which is, by the way a name for chronic pulmonary emphysema in horses. I must tell BB.);
  • aviation medicine;
  • space medicine (which is even better, one assumes);
  • the general theory of relativity;
  • the anti-Vietnam War movement;
  • and the Ugandan economy.
     I love the Internet. Thank you, and goodnight. And I'm sorry I didn't get to the editing, but really, look at this. I mean, look at it. I'm not worth a toss tonight. Really.
    

Oy

Thursday, 18 March 2010 12:06 am
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (nel as oneliel)
Inertial Dampener
     Here's how it worked.
     I developed a headache sometime between 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. I then ate the wrong thing, or not enough of the right thing, and the headache kept going. I decided against going for the big anti-pain guns because ... well, because. I have a bet going with myself.
     So. Where was I? Right. Headache.
     Watched television because that was easier than thinking with the the pain. Realized, of course, that one shouldn't watch television when one is in pain, but the inertia that flowed from a warm cat sitting on my lap, and flicking between "Twister" on one channel (I love that movie) and Rachel Maddow (who I believe should be one of my best friends, but to tell her so would be gauche, I think you'll agree) further slowed my thought processes, so that the option of turning off the screen didn't occur to me.
     The pain leveled up (and would our grandparents even understand such a phrase in their youth? No. Of course not, but then I won't understand the language of my grandchildren if it comes streaming out of the fog of the future into my ears at this moment) but I'd be damned if I was going to haul out the big guns.
    So I thought about writing a quick post before admitting defeat and going to bed. What to write, what to write?
    I let my fingers think for me, and the phrase "inertial dampener" flowed from them as a title. (Actually, my fingers first typed intertial, and I had to decide whether I really wanted to type "interstitial" or "inertial." The final decision was as you see above.
     And then I realized that a) I didn't think that had much to do with my own sense of inertia and b) I didn't rightly remember (or perhaps know in the first place) what an inertial dampener was. So I decided to go to Infoplease and type the phrase into their encyclopedia search.
     Among the items returned to me, courtesy the search results:
  • Mach's principle;
  • mass, in physics;
  • heaves (which is, by the way a name for chronic pulmonary emphysema in horses. I must tell BB.);
  • aviation medicine;
  • space medicine (which is even better, one assumes);
  • the general theory of relativity;
  • the anti-Vietnam War movement;
  • and the Ugandan economy.
     I love the Internet. Thank you, and goodnight. And I'm sorry I didn't get to the editing, but really, look at this. I mean, look at it. I'm not worth a toss tonight. Really.
    
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Ichigo)
[Error: unknown template qotd]
Oh. Well. That's easy. The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the Eighth Dimension. Case closed.

There's B. Banzai, after all. And Reno. And John Parker. And the Jet Car. And Penny Priddy. And the oscillation overthruster. And Professor Emilio Lizardo/Lord John Whorfin, the divergent magnificence of both brought to me by John Lithgow in what may arguably have been his finest role(s). You doubt it? "Laugh while you can, Monkey Boy."

Of course, B. Banzai has all the best lines, partly because they're great pointers for life. "Wherever you go, there you are." "Don't be mean."

Also, B. Banzai and the Hong Kong Cavaliers? They dance just as good as they walk. And they walk with style. Also, loads of narrow belts and ties. And syncopated music. And Perfect Tommy. And ... well, isn't Perfect Tommy enough? (Even though I much prefer Rawhide, and in my personal world he never did run into that particular Red Lectroid, and he's the reason I love Clancy Brown, not the stupid Highlander movie.) And the whole thing's the most brilliant pastiche and paean to Doc Savage that I've yet seen. It's a pity the other hour or so never saw daylight.

And you must read the book by Earl Mac Rauch. Really. It's of inestimable value for all fans of B. Banzai, and makes the movie even more wonderful.

Oh yeah; the rest of the question.

The essential ingredients for a cult classic are (she said, answering it like it was an essay question on a Grade Eleven History final): any suitable combination of off-kilter and generally vaguely scientifictional - or at least, in these degenerate latter days, somewhat niche pop-cultural plot points; attractive character aspects that can either be laughed at, yearned after, or both; one-liners (like whoah!!!); musical themes, any six bars of which, when heard on a radio or over a store sound system, will immediately throw one back into the theatrical experience; and appreciation of the absurd that talented but (possibly) over- or under-medicated writers can mix well and hand over to (possibly) yet-to-be-discovered or shouldn't-be-discovered directors and (definitely) under-appreciated, yet-to-be-discovered. or never-nope-won't-get-discovered actors.

There. I say these things three times, and they are true.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Ichigo)
[Error: unknown template qotd]
Oh. Well. That's easy. The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the Eighth Dimension. Case closed.

There's B. Banzai, after all. And Reno. And John Parker. And the Jet Car. And Penny Priddy. And the oscillation overthruster. And Professor Emilio Lizardo/Lord John Whorfin, the divergent magnificence of both brought to me by John Lithgow in what may arguably have been his finest role(s). You doubt it? "Laugh while you can, Monkey Boy."

Of course, B. Banzai has all the best lines, partly because they're great pointers for life. "Wherever you go, there you are." "Don't be mean."

Also, B. Banzai and the Hong Kong Cavaliers? They dance just as good as they walk. And they walk with style. Also, loads of narrow belts and ties. And syncopated music. And Perfect Tommy. And ... well, isn't Perfect Tommy enough? (Even though I much prefer Rawhide, and in my personal world he never did run into that particular Red Lectroid, and he's the reason I love Clancy Brown, not the stupid Highlander movie.) And the whole thing's the most brilliant pastiche and paean to Doc Savage that I've yet seen. It's a pity the other hour or so never saw daylight.

And you must read the book by Earl Mac Rauch. Really. It's of inestimable value for all fans of B. Banzai, and makes the movie even more wonderful.

Oh yeah; the rest of the question.

The essential ingredients for a cult classic are (she said, answering it like it was an essay question on a Grade Eleven History final): any suitable combination of off-kilter and generally vaguely scientifictional - or at least, in these degenerate latter days, somewhat niche pop-cultural plot points; attractive character aspects that can either be laughed at, yearned after, or both; one-liners (like whoah!!!); musical themes, any six bars of which, when heard on a radio or over a store sound system, will immediately throw one back into the theatrical experience; and appreciation of the absurd that talented but (possibly) over- or under-medicated writers can mix well and hand over to (possibly) yet-to-be-discovered or shouldn't-be-discovered directors and (definitely) under-appreciated, yet-to-be-discovered. or never-nope-won't-get-discovered actors.

There. I say these things three times, and they are true.

Freedom, Pending

Thursday, 17 December 2009 07:21 pm
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Intensegwen)
Guerrilla Chadors
The protesters in Iran continue to amaze me with their Awesome, for several reasons.

Freedom, Pending

Thursday, 17 December 2009 07:21 pm
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Intensegwen)
Guerrilla Chadors
The protesters in Iran continue to amaze me with their Awesome, for several reasons.

Canada

Monday, 31 August 2009 10:08 pm
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Default)
Welcome To The Working Week!!!

Yay! I may be able to post using something other than a phone! The local library has wireless, and I'll be able to get some time and catch up with the 20th century.

In the meantime, I'm in a much better headspace about the trip- probably a function of being at my Mom's place, and being able to hang up clothes, and stop living out of a suitcase.

More to come, later, I hope.

Canada

Monday, 31 August 2009 10:08 pm
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Default)
Welcome To The Working Week!!!

Yay! I may be able to post using something other than a phone! The local library has wireless, and I'll be able to get some time and catch up with the 20th century.

In the meantime, I'm in a much better headspace about the trip- probably a function of being at my Mom's place, and being able to hang up clothes, and stop living out of a suitcase.

More to come, later, I hope.
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (One - Bullshit!)
This Week in WTF

So, on Tuesday the California Supreme Court upheld - narrowly, the analysts assure us - Proposition 8.

I'm not a lawyer, so I won't say too much about the decision itself. It may indeed be the case that the CaliSupremes can give the legal equivalent of a disingenuous shrug saying, "Hey, it's that wacky California constitution. What can you do?" and follow it with the sop of saying, "But you 18,000 couples? Good for you - you won the It's Not Retroactive Lottery!"

If that's the case, I hope, at the very least, that this will force people in that state to turn a magnifying glass to the entire Prop model, and give serious thought to just how broken it may be.

When it comes to non-legalese, however,  I know where I stand. This. Stinks. On. Ice.

You can find most of my thoughts here, but one other thing occurred to me this week.

And it's here, under the cut because it's long. )


kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (One - Bullshit!)
This Week in WTF

So, on Tuesday the California Supreme Court upheld - narrowly, the analysts assure us - Proposition 8.

I'm not a lawyer, so I won't say too much about the decision itself. It may indeed be the case that the CaliSupremes can give the legal equivalent of a disingenuous shrug saying, "Hey, it's that wacky California constitution. What can you do?" and follow it with the sop of saying, "But you 18,000 couples? Good for you - you won the It's Not Retroactive Lottery!"

If that's the case, I hope, at the very least, that this will force people in that state to turn a magnifying glass to the entire Prop model, and give serious thought to just how broken it may be.

When it comes to non-legalese, however,  I know where I stand. This. Stinks. On. Ice.

You can find most of my thoughts here, but one other thing occurred to me this week.

And it's here, under the cut because it's long. )


kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Jesus Approves)
This Had Better Be Good.
     Failing that, I had better be patient. Or perhaps we can have both "good" and "patient" in the same place - good literature and a patient reader..
     I hasten to explain myself by informing you, my friends, of a precipitous and most unsensible purchase which I made lately of a local bookseller. I've picked up a rather hefty (but exceedingly well appointed, I again hasten to inform you) volume, entitled "Jane Austen: The Complete Novels."
   Just why have I done this thing, you ask? Because in my more than five decades of life I have never - no, not once - read an Austen novel. Not one. Not one chapter of one, nor one paragraph of one chapter, nor even the slightest, slenderest, most trifling of sentences in one paragraph.
   I have, however, watched a couple of BBC Austen adaptations, snickered my way through Lost in Austen, (ITV, right?) and decided that I should take a running jump at the lot of 'em.
   Because if I am anything, it is precipitous. I am, it seems, more of a hasty Marianne than a level-headed Elinor. The entire collection of novels in one shopping bag. Foolish. Simply foolish - particularly when I remember that I cut my reading eye-teeth on fairytales, Sturgeon and Edgar Rice Burroughs. No, I don't read him now. But my literary palette still seems to overflow with the very bright colors. Purple amongst them.
   I may retreat to my bedroom now, and read a chapter or two of something Austenish.


kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Jesus Approves)
This Had Better Be Good.
     Failing that, I had better be patient. Or perhaps we can have both "good" and "patient" in the same place - good literature and a patient reader..
     I hasten to explain myself by informing you, my friends, of a precipitous and most unsensible purchase which I made lately of a local bookseller. I've picked up a rather hefty (but exceedingly well appointed, I again hasten to inform you) volume, entitled "Jane Austen: The Complete Novels."
   Just why have I done this thing, you ask? Because in my more than five decades of life I have never - no, not once - read an Austen novel. Not one. Not one chapter of one, nor one paragraph of one chapter, nor even the slightest, slenderest, most trifling of sentences in one paragraph.
   I have, however, watched a couple of BBC Austen adaptations, snickered my way through Lost in Austen, (ITV, right?) and decided that I should take a running jump at the lot of 'em.
   Because if I am anything, it is precipitous. I am, it seems, more of a hasty Marianne than a level-headed Elinor. The entire collection of novels in one shopping bag. Foolish. Simply foolish - particularly when I remember that I cut my reading eye-teeth on fairytales, Sturgeon and Edgar Rice Burroughs. No, I don't read him now. But my literary palette still seems to overflow with the very bright colors. Purple amongst them.
   I may retreat to my bedroom now, and read a chapter or two of something Austenish.


kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Tosh and Gun)
Urge. To. Kill.
Reason #1,436,085 I am glad I do not have a gun or frequent flier miles. It's also reason #9,572,009 I am ... diffident ... about religiously-based gender roles. The laff riot really gets rolling around paras 7 and 8.
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Tosh and Gun)
Urge. To. Kill.
Reason #1,436,085 I am glad I do not have a gun or frequent flier miles. It's also reason #9,572,009 I am ... diffident ... about religiously-based gender roles. The laff riot really gets rolling around paras 7 and 8.
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Shalka Doc)
Anime, it is Strange.
And sometimes extremely brilliant. Creepy-impressive brilliant. Best Beloved and I are rewatching Serial Experiment Lain, which we first watched, in ragged and erratic fashion, on G4 TV. Back when there was a G4 TV. It's only twelve episodes long, which is a blessing, because a) it's so intense in style, my head might implode if it lasted longer; and b) it's so close to impentetrable in the way it explores its themes - and it hides those themes in and amidst the clutter of its silences and its light and dark patterns - that my head might rebuild itself, then implode again. As it is, I can only watch two episodes at a time - when I watch Bleach, I can suck back four or five episodes a night. (Mmmmm, Bleach. I love Bleach. But I digress ....)

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