kaffyr: Sarah Jane Smith and her young team at the computer (Team Sarah Jane)
A Very Big Adventure Needs Lots of Help

Since many of you have probably already seen this, and helped boost the signal yourselves, I'll just say that 
[personal profile] a_phoenixdragon , one of the sweetest, most hard-working, most imaginative people you could hope to meet, a woman who writes, mothers, binds a family together with fierce intensity no matter what the world throws at her, is about to embark on a great - and expensive - adventure. As someone who moved here 35 years ago with two suitcases, I know what it takes to undertake such an adventure when it's only one person. Doing it with a family is an amazing challenge. 

Here's a link to her GoFundMe page. As she says in her message, it's probably the worst time of year to ask for financial help, but if you can do so, know it's going to a very, very good cause. If you can't, let other folks know, and perhaps they can. 


kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Default)



Boosting the Signal

I think most of my f'list has seen this, but on the off-chance some of you haven't, I ask that you take a look at Nancy's fundraising page. She's 
[personal profile] editrx  here and over on Live Journal, and she is in love with words the way most of us. But she's done more than that; she's chosen to make her living with words, in several different ways. 

I'm a writer, and once upon a time I
 was an occasional editor. My love affair with books began long ago. But I would never have the confidence, ability or bravery that's necessary to start a book store, or to make my way in the modern world of editing. This lady had, and has, the guts to do so. She's worked harder at her dream than you can imagine.

Life's hit her hard recently; health problems, financial crises, personal tragedies ... but she doesn't want to give up. She's more wiling than many people I know to sacrifice for what what she chooses to do. Right now, though, sacrifice isn't enough, and circumstances are thisclose to bringing her dream down around her ears. 

She doesn't need much, in the grand scheme of things; but what she needs, she needs in 13 days. 

Please consider helping her. It would be, as my mother used to say, a star in your crown. 
kaffyr: (Dalek ballerina)
Scattershot

Things in no particular order:

Family stuff )
Got back to word of four major contract negotiation sessions scheduled for next week. Again, keep your fingers crossed.

Enjoyed Agents of SHIELD again last night; not quite as good as last week's, but set some intriguing plot points up. Ward became more human, and Ming Na and Clark Gregg rocked it.

I donated to Philippine Typhoon relief and I hope folks who can will do so also. There are a lot of good groups out there: the International Red Cross, Mercy Corps, Doctors Without Borders, to name just a few. Does anyone know if there are Dreamwidth or LJ fundraising efforts extant?

And finally, I'd meant to mention this a couple of weeks back. It's word of a film by Saudi filmmaker Haifaa Al-Mansour, one I'd love to see. The difficulties she dealt with to make the film are pointed reminders of every damned thing wrong with considering women a different species - and the film appears to be a joyous reminder that the different species insists on being human. Imagine that.
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Hello!)
It's Not Always About Me

Sometimes it's about far more wonderful people. People like [personal profile] a_phoenixdragon , who is, well, wonderful. Many of you already know how talented she is, how big-hearted, how much of an addition she has been to so many of our on-line lives. I recently had the pleasure of spending time with her at WisCon, and I can tell you, she's everything she is online, only Even Better.

Like all of us, she has more than occasional challenges to surmount. Like all of us, she occasionally needs a helping hand. I know I've been doing a lot of asking people for things lately, but if you can bear with me just a little longer, I'm going to ask you to consider helping out a lady who is extremely deserving.

Here's what she has to say, and here's a way that you might be able to help out.

Thank you.



kaffyr: The newsies contemplate striking (Stop the presses)
Getting the Picture
Three Things You Can Do If You Believe in Justice and Journalism

Folks, it's been a hell of a few days for me, ever since my bosses at Wrapports Inc./Sun-Times Media, the publisher of the Chicago Sun-Times, and of my Pioneer Press newspapers, fired all 28 professional photographers, and announced it planned to replace their work with those of untrained reporters like me, using iPhones to take pictures and videos. A hell of a few days for me, but a nightmare for the 28 colleagues who were unceremoniously, unfairly and, we believe, illegally fired. 

It's also a nightmare for anyone who cares about getting, reading and viewing good journalism. I know the friends I have here online understand the importance of journalism to Democracy. There's a reason we're called the Fourth Estate, and even when we fall down on the job,  we're doing our best to perform a service for democracy, for this country, and for the world. I don't feel in the least hyperbolic or cheesy in saying that either.

You may not live in Chicago; you may not have to deal with the lowered value and degraded quality of Wrapports Inc./Sun-Times Media newspapers. But you understand the kind of horrific precedent this sets. So, if you'll pardon me taking the liberty, I'm going to ask you to consider helping us fight back. There are three ways you can do it:

1) Watch this interview with Pulitzer Prize winning former Sun-Times photographer John H. White. It'll give you an idea of the quality that these men have so cavalierly discarded, to our detriment, and their own.

2) Call and Email:  If you believe that a news gathering organization needs high quality, professional photojournalism in order to do its duty by its readers and advertisers, please make your concerns known to Wrapports LLC CEO Tim Knight (  312-321-3025  , tknight@suntimes.com) and Wrapports LLC Chairman Michael Ferro (michael@suntimes.com), and to Jim Kirk, who is Chief of Editorial Operations (jkirk@suntimes.com,  312-321-2577  ). Asking them to bargain in good faith with the Guild couldn't hurt, either.

3) And finally, consider signing this petition, on behalf of the photographers by The Newspaper Guild.

The last two are pressure tactics, and pressure tactics are invaluable tools in our fight to regain the photographers' jobs, and to win a contract that will protect them, us and, by extension, the potential for good, solid local and regional journalism in the greater Chicago area. The three men I mention in 2) are extraordinarily conscious of publicity, of how they look to the public, to their shareholders and to potential investors. This is particularly true of Knight and Ferro. Please help us to put pressure on the two men who hold the potential of reversing the most disastrous decision to affect a newspaper chain in years.

Thank you for reading, and considering my plea.

kaffyr: A happy smiling superintelligent Corgi (Ein is happy)
To my cat-loving Chicago area f'list

It's public service announcement time!

My next door neighbor, who is a wonderful soul with a beautiful smile and a heart approximately the size of Wisconsin, rescues cats upon occasion, cares for them and then finds good homes for them where possible. Mostly recently, one of the cats she is caring for gave birth to kittens, requiring her to expand her "Got Kitties?" message circle.

Here's the message she sent out to her friends; I've redacted her phone number, but included a picture of one of the cuties involved. If you or anyone you know are interested in a) helping a wonderful woman and b) having one or two balls of bright-eyed sweetness in your life, PM me and I'll give you her phone number.

"Hello everyone; born the end of June, two kitten siblings, one B/W male (aka Napoleon) and a tiger striped female (aka Fluffy) are ready to bust, once again, out of the bathroom into a good home. They got a clean bill of health from Treehouse this past Thursday, are healthy (thankfully both FIV, FeLuk negative), are neutered and have gotten vaccinations and are ID chipped. I'm hoping to adopt them together."

 
 
 
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Help Japan)
After the Wave

[livejournal.com profile] honorh , about whom so many of us in the Doctor Who fan community worried in the days after Japan's earthquake and tsunami disaster, has written about her experience. It is well worth reading, a reminder both of human resilience and decency, and of Japan's continuing travail and need. She has also provided a follow up comment, here at her journal.
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Help Japan)
After the Wave

[livejournal.com profile] honorh , about whom so many of us in the Doctor Who fan community worried in the days after Japan's earthquake and tsunami disaster, has written about her experience. It is well worth reading, a reminder both of human resilience and decency, and of Japan's continuing travail and need. She has also provided a follow up comment, here at her journal.

My [livejournal.com profile] help_japan thread

Saturday, 26 March 2011 12:21 pm
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Help Japan)
Just a Quick Reminder ...


... that bidding in the [livejournal.com profile] help_japan  auction ends March 31* or March 30, depending on your time zone**. Here's my thread - I've offered a story of between 800 and 1,200 words to the winner (but admit that it might end up being longer.) Currently, the bidding stands at $35. If you'd like to help people who desperately need our help, and get the chance to hand me challenging prompts at the same time, feel free to head on over and up the ante!

*Thanks to [info]clocketpatch  for unconfusing me about when bidding closes, as opposed to offers. Duh....
**...aaand thanks to [info]wendymr  for reminding me about the time changes. Looks like bidding will end at 5 p.m. on the 30th of March, Chicago time.

My [livejournal.com profile] help_japan thread

Saturday, 26 March 2011 12:21 pm
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Help Japan)
Just a Quick Reminder ...


... that bidding in the [livejournal.com profile] help_japan  auction ends March 31* or March 30, depending on your time zone**. Here's my thread - I've offered a story of between 800 and 1,200 words to the winner (but admit that it might end up being longer.) Currently, the bidding stands at $35. If you'd like to help people who desperately need our help, and get the chance to hand me challenging prompts at the same time, feel free to head on over and up the ante!

*Thanks to [info]clocketpatch  for unconfusing me about when bidding closes, as opposed to offers. Duh....
**...aaand thanks to [info]wendymr  for reminding me about the time changes. Looks like bidding will end at 5 p.m. on the 30th of March, Chicago time.
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Help Japan)
Here is My Thread ...

... at the [livejournal.com profile] help_japan  auction. I'm offering a story of between 800 and 1,200.

Browse through auction offerings - in addition to words, people are offering graphics, art, food, and other items, and it's all to help the people of Japan!
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Help Japan)
Here is My Thread ...

... at the [livejournal.com profile] help_japan  auction. I'm offering a story of between 800 and 1,200.

Browse through auction offerings - in addition to words, people are offering graphics, art, food, and other items, and it's all to help the people of Japan!
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Help Japan)
Waves

Since Friday I've watched news of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan with an extra ache in my heart. [livejournal.com profile] honorh , a member of the Doctor Who and fandom community, was living in one of the coastal areas hit - hard - by the disasters, and was officially listed as missing. 

She has been found, and is safe.

I can't tell you what weight lifted from my heart with this word. Despite not knowing Katie in what we laughingly refer to as real life, fear and concern for her kept me glued to my computer all day yesterday, awaiting news updates from dedicated friends like [livejournal.com profile] wendymr , who is owed a vote of thanks for her efforts. During that time, another friend, [livejournal.com profile] lindenharp , suggested that we show our support for Katie by decorating her profile page with the $2.99 Save Japan v-gifts offered by Live Journal. In roughly a day, 75 gifts to her earned more than $224 for relief efforts.

It's astonishing to realize that the Internet has this power to knit strangers together in a form of friendship that is unlike any form of friendship we've previously known. It combines anonymity and an impersonal framework with intensely personal emotional involvement. And it brings the world to us in a way we can't - and shouldn't - escape.

Katie is safe. But Japan still needs our help, as body counts spiral and nuclear plant melt-down scenarios and realities escalate. I know that we have seen and responded to so many world disasters in the past few years that charitable response burnout threatens. We can't let it, though. These people need our help.

Here is a very partial list of organizations who need our help to give Japan help. And here on Live Journal, the [livejournal.com profile] help_japan  community is preparing to start a fund raising auction, as well as giving information on other ways and places to help. If you can, consider donating goods, stories or art, or bids.



kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Help Japan)
Waves

Since Friday I've watched news of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan with an extra ache in my heart. [livejournal.com profile] honorh , a member of the Doctor Who and fandom community, was living in one of the coastal areas hit - hard - by the disasters, and was officially listed as missing. 

She has been found, and is safe.

I can't tell you what weight lifted from my heart with this word. Despite not knowing Katie in what we laughingly refer to as real life, fear and concern for her kept me glued to my computer all day yesterday, awaiting news updates from dedicated friends like [livejournal.com profile] wendymr , who is owed a vote of thanks for her efforts. During that time, another friend, [livejournal.com profile] lindenharp , suggested that we show our support for Katie by decorating her profile page with the $2.99 Save Japan v-gifts offered by Live Journal. In roughly a day, 75 gifts to her earned more than $224 for relief efforts.

It's astonishing to realize that the Internet has this power to knit strangers together in a form of friendship that is unlike any form of friendship we've previously known. It combines anonymity and an impersonal framework with intensely personal emotional involvement. And it brings the world to us in a way we can't - and shouldn't - escape.

Katie is safe. But Japan still needs our help, as body counts spiral and nuclear plant melt-down scenarios and realities escalate. I know that we have seen and responded to so many world disasters in the past few years that charitable response burnout threatens. We can't let it, though. These people need our help.

Here is a very partial list of organizations who need our help to give Japan help. And here on Live Journal, the [livejournal.com profile] help_japan  community is preparing to start a fund raising auction, as well as giving information on other ways and places to help. If you can, consider donating goods, stories or art, or bids.



kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (The End & Start)
And Now, the Traditional Election Day Rant
    (Actually, it's the message I have been wont to broadcast indiscriminately over the last few years, any time an election appears on the horizon. Here it is again, because I think it's important. I hope you take it seriously. Because Democracy, besides being as necessary as oxygen to the healthy human condition, is as serious as a kick in the teeth. Or childbirth, if we want a slightly less disturbing image.
    Mind you, Democracy is disturbing. So read, do, lather, rinse, repeat as necessary.)

***********   *********   ************

 Consider elections, my friends. And consider well what you do before elections, the day of elections, and in the weeks and years between elections. What you do is important. The actions you take will either save democracy or kill it.

 First, if you aren't registered to vote promise yourself, and me, that you will register the day after this election, and vote the next time out.


If you are registered, vote - in this election and in every election, big or small, thereafter. Do it even if you aren't enamored of all your choices, even if you don't think it's an election that matters. That doesn't let you off the hook. Find at least one race that will affect you; make a choice, even if it is the lesser of two evils. Often "the lesser of two evils" turns out to be one of two things - "better than one expected," or "helping keep the greater of two evils out." In either case, your vote is important.

A political meme that still inexplicably enjoys some coin puts forth the idea that a) one's vote doesn't count and b) one's vote is important enough to be withheld from the ballot box as a form of protest.

The illogic inherent between the front and back end of that message is staggering. If you want to sound like some first year Business Communications major/French Lit minor trying to impress a potential roll in the hay with your world-weary political sophistication, go ahead and believe it. If you are a Business Comm/French Lit student and understand the stupidity of that little conceit, my apologies.

The only person who pays attention to an "unvote" is the campaign strategist for the winning candidate; she's the one who's glad her opponent's candidate was the beneficiary of every single unvote not in the ballot box.

 If votes don't count, we're to blame. Make them count again. Try showing up and voting, each and every election, in a way that Americans (and Canadians, unfortunately) haven't been regularly doing for 20 plus years. Bet you a nickel that they start counting again.

 And after you've voted, don't walk away. You didn't think your responsibilities ended with the election canvass, did you? Our biggest job as citizens is just beginning.

We have a responsibility to keep ourselves informed on issues, even the ones we don't care about, because they can still be important. We must pay attention to what our elected representatives are doing, what they're saying, what laws they're drafting or co-sponsoring, what committees they're on,

 That's not difficult, friends. The information is out there, and easy to get, via C-Span, the news, and our elected representatives' own offices. Oh, and this; Teh Intarwebz, where those representatives can be checked out via their sites and others. (What, you thought it was just LOLcats and porn?)

Then use your phones, your emails, your "send" button (I used to mention faxes, but I'll relegate faxes to the shelf where we put rotary dial AT&T phones, Zenith 15" black and white televisions and oil lamps.) Let our elected representatives - at all levels - know what we think of their performance, their votes, their comments, how they're doing on subcommittees, etc. We have to tell them what we want them to do for us and for the country.

 In short, we must hold our reps' feet to the fire. Surprisingly, it works. They pay attention when we do that; take it from someone who's watched the system. Even the less than stellar ones will pay attention. It's hard, but it's the way human constituents must and should interact with their very human representatives.

 And we're more apt to get civil, informed discourse in the political arena if we take the five minutes to call (even if you just speak with an assistant, be assured the message will get through) and say something like this:

 "Ma'am, I want you to refrain from grandstanding. I support you when you support/oppose these things, so you don't have to play to me. Please listen to your opponents, and try to change their minds with logic, don't ambush them in front of the cameras. But please be brave enough to oppose them when you know you should, even if it's not a popular stand. Please be brave enough to ignore the lobbyists. Please pay attention to my streets, *and* to read the bills you vote on. You must take care of me locally and nationally. You don't have to hide the truth from me; I'm an adult, and I know how to take it. I'll respect you more if you do these things than if you don't. And please expect more calls from me. Thank you."

First we vote, then we hold them accountable. 

Or perhaps I'm just blowing smoke from inappropriate egresses.

Wait, let me think.

 No. No, I'm right.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (The End & Start)
And Now, the Traditional Election Day Rant
    (Actually, it's the message I have been wont to broadcast indiscriminately over the last few years, any time an election appears on the horizon. Here it is again, because I think it's important. I hope you take it seriously. Because Democracy, besides being as necessary as oxygen to the healthy human condition, is as serious as a kick in the teeth. Or childbirth, if we want a slightly less disturbing image.
    Mind you, Democracy is disturbing. So read, do, lather, rinse, repeat as necessary.)

***********   *********   ************

 Consider elections, my friends. And consider well what you do before elections, the day of elections, and in the weeks and years between elections. What you do is important. The actions you take will either save democracy or kill it.

 First, if you aren't registered to vote promise yourself, and me, that you will register the day after this election, and vote the next time out.


If you are registered, vote - in this election and in every election, big or small, thereafter. Do it even if you aren't enamored of all your choices, even if you don't think it's an election that matters. That doesn't let you off the hook. Find at least one race that will affect you; make a choice, even if it is the lesser of two evils. Often "the lesser of two evils" turns out to be one of two things - "better than one expected," or "helping keep the greater of two evils out." In either case, your vote is important.

A political meme that still inexplicably enjoys some coin puts forth the idea that a) one's vote doesn't count and b) one's vote is important enough to be withheld from the ballot box as a form of protest.

The illogic inherent between the front and back end of that message is staggering. If you want to sound like some first year Business Communications major/French Lit minor trying to impress a potential roll in the hay with your world-weary political sophistication, go ahead and believe it. If you are a Business Comm/French Lit student and understand the stupidity of that little conceit, my apologies.

The only person who pays attention to an "unvote" is the campaign strategist for the winning candidate; she's the one who's glad her opponent's candidate was the beneficiary of every single unvote not in the ballot box.

 If votes don't count, we're to blame. Make them count again. Try showing up and voting, each and every election, in a way that Americans (and Canadians, unfortunately) haven't been regularly doing for 20 plus years. Bet you a nickel that they start counting again.

 And after you've voted, don't walk away. You didn't think your responsibilities ended with the election canvass, did you? Our biggest job as citizens is just beginning.

We have a responsibility to keep ourselves informed on issues, even the ones we don't care about, because they can still be important. We must pay attention to what our elected representatives are doing, what they're saying, what laws they're drafting or co-sponsoring, what committees they're on,

 That's not difficult, friends. The information is out there, and easy to get, via C-Span, the news, and our elected representatives' own offices. Oh, and this; Teh Intarwebz, where those representatives can be checked out via their sites and others. (What, you thought it was just LOLcats and porn?)

Then use your phones, your emails, your "send" button (I used to mention faxes, but I'll relegate faxes to the shelf where we put rotary dial AT&T phones, Zenith 15" black and white televisions and oil lamps.) Let our elected representatives - at all levels - know what we think of their performance, their votes, their comments, how they're doing on subcommittees, etc. We have to tell them what we want them to do for us and for the country.

 In short, we must hold our reps' feet to the fire. Surprisingly, it works. They pay attention when we do that; take it from someone who's watched the system. Even the less than stellar ones will pay attention. It's hard, but it's the way human constituents must and should interact with their very human representatives.

 And we're more apt to get civil, informed discourse in the political arena if we take the five minutes to call (even if you just speak with an assistant, be assured the message will get through) and say something like this:

 "Ma'am, I want you to refrain from grandstanding. I support you when you support/oppose these things, so you don't have to play to me. Please listen to your opponents, and try to change their minds with logic, don't ambush them in front of the cameras. But please be brave enough to oppose them when you know you should, even if it's not a popular stand. Please be brave enough to ignore the lobbyists. Please pay attention to my streets, *and* to read the bills you vote on. You must take care of me locally and nationally. You don't have to hide the truth from me; I'm an adult, and I know how to take it. I'll respect you more if you do these things than if you don't. And please expect more calls from me. Thank you."

First we vote, then we hold them accountable. 

Or perhaps I'm just blowing smoke from inappropriate egresses.

Wait, let me think.

 No. No, I'm right.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Default)
To Every Thing There is a Season
Nine years ago tomorrow, things fell apart. We're still trying to put things back together. It's difficult, because, nine years on, we still can't find all the broken pieces and we still can't decide how they go together, and we're still fighting over how it got to be so bad that things fell apart, and we're still figuring out whether we need new pieces.

And part of the difficulties are the thousands of souls no longer here who were, nine years ago today.

And part of the difficulties are all the souls — hundreds and hundreds and unending hundreds of them, young and old, man and woman, deliberate and accidental, son, daughter, father, mother, fighter, non-com, ally and adversary — that followed those first ones into the dark.

And part of the difficulties are that what fell apart here was echoed and presaged and iterated and reiterated, before and after, like images in a puzzle of mirrors. all over the world. And now things are falling apart for people we don't know, oceans and cultures away, but it's all still connected.

It's hard to put things back together when the blocks we reach for may only be images in the mirrors of our own fears, or someone else's fears, or worse.

It's hard to put things back together when we can't agree on what they looked like before, or what they should look like now.

It's hard to put things together when people stand in the wreckage and glory in it, even as they hate everyone else standing in the wreckage and glorying in it.

It's hard to put things back together when people are shooting at us, harder still when our own hands are filled with guns and not blocks.

And love is not the answer, or at least not all of it.

Patience is.
Willingness to listen is.
Willingness to restrain our anger is.
Willingness to see the other.
Willingness to work hard to make the other see us.
Willingness to work hard, period.
Willingness to fail; over, and over, and over, until we get it right.

And it's hard, because we're not the only ones in the equation. And others have to learn those lessons, too, and how the hell do we convince them to learn, and help us find and fix the things that fell apart?

And then we need a break from the lords of chance and change, ensuring that everyone, on all sides, grows weary of salting the earth and burning the bridges and living in hate.

I don't know how to do it any more than you know, at least not all of it. That's the problem when things fall apart. None of us has one answer, one answer seems to be all we're looking for, and even if there was one answer, we probably couldn't agree on it, or bring ourselves to follow its dictates.

do know what we don't need. Screaming over a community center or a place of worship. I found this particularly helpful. And I signed this. If you decide to do it, pass it on, would you?
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Default)
To Every Thing There is a Season
Nine years ago tomorrow, things fell apart. We're still trying to put things back together. It's difficult, because, nine years on, we still can't find all the broken pieces and we still can't decide how they go together, and we're still fighting over how it got to be so bad that things fell apart, and we're still figuring out whether we need new pieces.

And part of the difficulties are the thousands of souls no longer here who were, nine years ago today.

And part of the difficulties are all the souls — hundreds and hundreds and unending hundreds of them, young and old, man and woman, deliberate and accidental, son, daughter, father, mother, fighter, non-com, ally and adversary — that followed those first ones into the dark.

And part of the difficulties are that what fell apart here was echoed and presaged and iterated and reiterated, before and after, like images in a puzzle of mirrors. all over the world. And now things are falling apart for people we don't know, oceans and cultures away, but it's all still connected.

It's hard to put things back together when the blocks we reach for may only be images in the mirrors of our own fears, or someone else's fears, or worse.

It's hard to put things back together when we can't agree on what they looked like before, or what they should look like now.

It's hard to put things together when people stand in the wreckage and glory in it, even as they hate everyone else standing in the wreckage and glorying in it.

It's hard to put things back together when people are shooting at us, harder still when our own hands are filled with guns and not blocks.

And love is not the answer, or at least not all of it.

Patience is.
Willingness to listen is.
Willingness to restrain our anger is.
Willingness to see the other.
Willingness to work hard to make the other see us.
Willingness to work hard, period.
Willingness to fail; over, and over, and over, until we get it right.

And it's hard, because we're not the only ones in the equation. And others have to learn those lessons, too, and how the hell do we convince them to learn, and help us find and fix the things that fell apart?

And then we need a break from the lords of chance and change, ensuring that everyone, on all sides, grows weary of salting the earth and burning the bridges and living in hate.

I don't know how to do it any more than you know, at least not all of it. That's the problem when things fall apart. None of us has one answer, one answer seems to be all we're looking for, and even if there was one answer, we probably couldn't agree on it, or bring ourselves to follow its dictates.

do know what we don't need. Screaming over a community center or a place of worship. I found this particularly helpful. And I signed this. If you decide to do it, pass it on, would you?
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Nine in Gallifreyan)
Title: Dam-busting
Author: [livejournal.com profile] kaffyr 
Characters: the Ninth Doctor, OC
Rating: PG-13
Summary: A story in which the Doctor learns that scars are ugly, but better than open wounds; and  that not all hearts can be broken.
Edited: by the incomparable [livejournal.com profile] dr_whuh 
Author's note: This is the second of two stories won of me by [livejournal.com profile] zenitt  during the [livejournal.com profile] help_haiti  auction. He is the master of challenging prompts, and I have already acknowledged to him that I wandered off the path a bit with this one. I hope he forgives me, and I thank him again for pushing me past my normal comfort levels and into something passing strange and wonderful. And for those who pay attention to these things, this story follows immediately on the heels of my story Ice Like Centuries. It can be read as a stand-alone, but gains some context if the other is read.
Disclaimer: I do not own anything in the Whoniverse. They are owned by the BBC and their various creators. I do, however, love them all, and thank the BBC for letting me play (and create the occasional original character) in their own sandbox.
Addendum: The poem Lumsden Dam is Copyright 1995 Kathryn Routliffe/Who, Me? Music

*****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****


He was drowning. )
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Default)
Title: Dam-busting
Author: [livejournal.com profile] kaffyr 
Characters: the Ninth Doctor, OC
Rating: PG-13
Summary: A story in which the Doctor learns that scars are ugly, but better than open wounds; and  that not all hearts can be broken.
Edited: by the incomparable [livejournal.com profile] dr_whuh 
Author's note: This is the second of two stories won of me by [livejournal.com profile] zenitt  during the [livejournal.com profile] help_haiti  auction. He is the master of challenging prompts, and I have already acknowledged to him that I wandered off the path a bit with this one. I hope he forgives me, and I thank him again for pushing me past my normal comfort levels and into something passing strange and wonderful. And for those who pay attention to these things, this story follows immediately on the heels of my story Ice Like Centuries. It can be read as a stand-alone, but gains some context if the other is read.
Disclaimer: I do not own anything in the Whoniverse. They are owned by the BBC and their various creators. I do, however, love them all, and thank the BBC for letting me play (and create the occasional original character) in their own sandbox.
Addendum: The poem Lumsden Dam is Copyright 1995 Kathryn Routliffe/Who, Me? Music

*****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****     *****


He was drowning. )
***********************

He fell asleep once they were in the Vortex, real sleep, not unconsciousness, and opened his eyes underwater. This time, he kept them open. He still lay face down on the bottom, but there were rocks down there, not sand, and the water was clear. He put out his hands — they moved so slowly in the rushing current — and placed them on the two largest rocks he could find. He pushed down, and felt his shoulders break the waves. Using all the energy of that downward push, he flung his head back out of the water. He was free.

--30--
 


kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Fanfic - Karaoke)
She Writes. Sort Of. Again.
The total tonight is 583. And yes, I'm pleased. I think I know where I'm going. Once I get there, of course, I have all of time and space to play with. I think. Which is rather frightening, if I take too much time to think about it. So I won't. Five Hundred and Eighty Three. Yes, it looks fairly impressive that way. Heh.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Fanfic - Karaoke)
She Writes. Sort Of. Again.
The total tonight is 583. And yes, I'm pleased. I think I know where I'm going. Once I get there, of course, I have all of time and space to play with. I think. Which is rather frightening, if I take too much time to think about it. So I won't. Five Hundred and Eighty Three. Yes, it looks fairly impressive that way. Heh.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Nine in Gallifreyan)
She Writes. Sort Of.
The word count on my last [livejournal.com profile] help_haiti  fic for [livejournal.com profile] zenitt is 2,078. See? I'm not a complete waste of space. Or time. And the story's called
Dam-busting.
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Nine in Gallifreyan)
She Writes. Sort Of.
The word count on my last [livejournal.com profile] help_haiti  fic for [livejournal.com profile] zenitt is 2,078. See? I'm not a complete waste of space. Or time. And the story's called
Dam-busting.
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Hero Trio)
Title: There's No "I" in Team. There May, However, Be Idiots
Author: [livejournal.com profile] kaffyr 
Characters: Nine/Jack/Rose
Rating: PG-13
Summary:
Jack, Rose and the Doctor work spectacularly well together. But they can also misinterpret, misunderstand and misjudge each other, to sometimes spectacular ends.
Edited: the spectacular [livejournal.com profile] dr_whuh 
Author's Notes: I wrote this for  [livejournal.com profile] yamx , who won a story for me in the help_haiti auction, and it's part of their* Same Prompt Project. That prompt? "Jack annoys Nine and has to face the consequences (can be gen, or Jack/Nine, or Jack/Nine/Rose, or undetermined)." The story got away from me at one point, but I believe I coaxed it back into the land of the germane.
Disclaimer: I might wish it were otherwise, for I love them greatly, but I don't own anything in the Whoniverse, nor do I own any characters who originated in Doctor Who; both are owned solely by the BBC and their various creations. I earn nothing and intend no infringements.

* I've learned my lesson. Neutral (if somewhat ungrammatical in the traditional tradition) pronouns until one can be reasonably sure of gender.

**********************

   
"I'm not listening." )

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