kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Blue Jack)
For Those of Us Who Love Jack Harkness ....
I commend to you this excellent essay by [livejournal.com profile] joking . I am truly struck by her thoughtful observations on the parallels of love, creation and destruction in The Captain's life. It is beautifully put together, and was a joy for me to read.
kaffyr: The TARDIS at Giverny (TARDIS at Giverny)
Steven and Russell and How to Make Jewelry

There are two necklaces on the table before you. The first is the one that catches your eye. It's an intricate piece, with chased silver worked into cunning frames for colorful faceted gemstones, gorgeous things that refract and reflect all the available light. The strand holding this confection together is so delicate that it almost seems to disappear when held against that light. You turn your eyes to the other necklace. It is less appealing; several pewter ovals with serviceable engravings of nice images, perhaps flowers or birds, together on a sturdy chain with a solid clasp.

You pick up the first, and the chain breaks. The lovely chased silver settings hit the floor, and you discover their stones were loose to begin with. They are dashed free of the metal and, when some of them shatter against the floor you realize they weren't really stones, at least not all of them. Some were just glass. You sigh, and pick up the pewter necklace, put it around your neck, and are grateful for the sturdy chain and strong clasp, and the pewter? Well, it grows warm against your skin, and the dull gleam of it is somehow homey. It'll do.

Which would you have? The cleverly-made one that falls apart and may not be quite as cleverly-made as you thought at first? Or the sturdy pewter piece that isn't artistry at all, just adequate craft, but which holds together, which will do while you search for something truly beautiful? (Because after all, neither one is really right, eh?)

It gets a bit byzantine under the cut. )
kaffyr: The TARDIS at Giverny (TARDIS at Giverny)
Steven and Russell and How to Make Jewelry

There are two necklaces on the table before you. The first is the one that catches your eye. It's an intricate piece, with chased silver worked into cunning frames for colorful faceted gemstones, gorgeous things that refract and reflect all the available light. The strand holding this confection together is so delicate that it almost seems to disappear when held against that light. You turn your eyes to the other necklace. It is less appealing; several pewter ovals with serviceable engravings of nice images, perhaps flowers or birds, together on a sturdy chain with a solid clasp.

You pick up the first, and the chain breaks. The lovely chased silver settings hit the floor, and you discover their stones were loose to begin with. They are dashed free of the metal and, when some of them shatter against the floor you realize they weren't really stones, at least not all of them. Some were just glass. You sigh, and pick up the pewter necklace, put it around your neck, and are grateful for the sturdy chain and strong clasp, and the pewter? Well, it grows warm against your skin, and the dull gleam of it is somehow homey. It'll do.

Which would you have? The cleverly-made one that falls apart and may not be quite as cleverly-made as you thought at first? Or the sturdy pewter piece that isn't artistry at all, just adequate craft, but which holds together, which will do while you search for something truly beautiful? (Because after all, neither one is really right, eh?)

It gets a bit byzantine under the cut. )
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Free for Use of the Public)
Go Here, She Said
To be more specific, go and read this excellent, and beautifully written, essay on Steven Moffat, on Dr. Who, and on "The Beast Below," by [livejournal.com profile] malsperanza . Actually, this is more than an essay; it's a contemplation on the nature of, and belief in, wonder and terror  and how the two are the obverse of each other.
(Here's just a taste: "Moffat is much given to statements like "Don't blink. Blink and you're dead" and explaining that houses have rooms that you can only see out of the corner of your eye, and that the cracks in walls are rifts in time-space. Here Be Monsters. Things that appear to be inanimate have lives (often not happy ones) and thoughts (often not nice ones), and therefore we should take the universe a lot more seriously than we do. ... This is Tolkien country, where there is a willow grows aslant a brook not in order to be picturesque and pastoral, but to eat you if you are so foolish as to come too near.")
She sees patterns here, and draws us to watch those patterns, and urges us to think. I like it a great deal. I don't agree with all of it, and I hope to be able to make a coherently-written response, either over there, or here. In the meantime, however, more people need to see what she's written.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Free for Use of the Public)
Go Here, She Said
To be more specific, go and read this excellent, and beautifully written, essay on Steven Moffat, on Dr. Who, and on "The Beast Below," by [livejournal.com profile] malsperanza . Actually, this is more than an essay; it's a contemplation on the nature of, and belief in, wonder and terror  and how the two are the obverse of each other.
(Here's just a taste: "Moffat is much given to statements like "Don't blink. Blink and you're dead" and explaining that houses have rooms that you can only see out of the corner of your eye, and that the cracks in walls are rifts in time-space. Here Be Monsters. Things that appear to be inanimate have lives (often not happy ones) and thoughts (often not nice ones), and therefore we should take the universe a lot more seriously than we do. ... This is Tolkien country, where there is a willow grows aslant a brook not in order to be picturesque and pastoral, but to eat you if you are so foolish as to come too near.")
She sees patterns here, and draws us to watch those patterns, and urges us to think. I like it a great deal. I don't agree with all of it, and I hope to be able to make a coherently-written response, either over there, or here. In the meantime, however, more people need to see what she's written.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Black Mirror)
Time and Tide
It took a while, but I finally tidied up the inside of my head enough to put some thoughts down relating to "Waters of Mars." Not a review, actually; more a riff and a contemplation. But yes, to cut from my own febrile blatherings to the chase, I liked it, a great deal. And perhaps I'll have other thoughts on it before The End, of a less floridly purple nature. Time and tide wait for no one. )
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Black Mirror)
Time and Tide
It took a while, but I finally tidied up the inside of my head enough to put some thoughts down relating to "Waters of Mars." Not a review, actually; more a riff and a contemplation. But yes, to cut from my own febrile blatherings to the chase, I liked it, a great deal. And perhaps I'll have other thoughts on it before The End, of a less floridly purple nature. Time and tide wait for no one. )
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Intensegwen)
See, This is What Good Writing Generates
     The fact that Children of Earth is still rattling around my skull days after I watched it, the fact that certain scenes replay over and over in my head because I'm so impressed with them (no, not That One), and the fact that the story makes me think about the real world as much as it does the Whoniverse is, for me, strong proof of the series' quality.
     Here's another quite brilliant take, by the talented [livejournal.com profile] selenak . (Many thanks to [livejournal.com profile] honorh  for pointing me to the essay and the essayist.) Go. Read. Respond.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Intensegwen)
See, This is What Good Writing Generates
     The fact that Children of Earth is still rattling around my skull days after I watched it, the fact that certain scenes replay over and over in my head because I'm so impressed with them (no, not That One), and the fact that the story makes me think about the real world as much as it does the Whoniverse is, for me, strong proof of the series' quality.
     Here's another quite brilliant take, by the talented [livejournal.com profile] selenak . (Many thanks to [livejournal.com profile] honorh  for pointing me to the essay and the essayist.) Go. Read. Respond.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Intensegwen)
Children Of Earth Considered
Or, to be more specific, here's a commentary  by [livejournal.com profile] sensiblecat  , about Children of Earth. It impressed me a great deal. (I know the redoubtable [livejournal.com profile] scarfman  has already read and rec'd it, but one can never recommend good writing or thinking too much.) I don't necessarily agree with her conclusions, but this is the kind of CoE response that's worth its weight in gold, with nary an OMG Noez to be seen.

kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Intensegwen)
Children Of Earth Considered
Or, to be more specific, here's a commentary  by [livejournal.com profile] sensiblecat  , about Children of Earth. It impressed me a great deal. (I know the redoubtable [livejournal.com profile] scarfman  has already read and rec'd it, but one can never recommend good writing or thinking too much.) I don't necessarily agree with her conclusions, but this is the kind of CoE response that's worth its weight in gold, with nary an OMG Noez to be seen.

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